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Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day

On March 30, 1973 all U.S. troops withdrew from Vietnam. Instead of receiving a welcome fitting for the sacrifice they made for this country, the majority of the returning troops were met with criticism and hostility.

Frustration. Anger. Disloyal. Unappreciated. All of these words could describe the possible feelings and thoughts that went through the minds of these individuals. Some of these troops were drafted, yet still fought and died for the lives of the men to their right and left, only to be diminished for their accomplishments upon their return.

Over nine million military personnel served during the Vietnam War. Of that number 58,156 lost their lives, while 303,704 were wounded in action.

Politics played a key role in the lack of respect that was due to these individuals. Back then those who were against the war did not support the troops like many do today. Now, government is taking an opportunity to return that respect to the troops.

The U.S. Senate passed a resolution on March 7, 2011, declaring March 30 “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day.” The resolution currently awaits a decision by the House. This day will be recognized across the U.S. as a day of commemoration, a day to pay the proper respect to the veterans who sacrificed so much during the war.

Vietnam Veteran’s Day is a chance to repair the wrong done to these troops. The people of the United States can finally pay the respect due them.

Many cities and states have events planned for these veterans. Marines from Marine Corps Logistics Base in Barstow, Calif., have planned a ceremony honoring the Vietnam troops, followed by a parade through Fort Irwin. The base is also hosting a motorcycle ride in their honor.

We should all take this day to give our appreciation to our Vietnam veterans. Taking time out from our busy lives to give thanks for the sacrifices of those who we don’t know is a display of kindness and admiration that means so much to those who expect so little.

Thank you all for what you have done. Semper Fidelis.

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  • suzanne conlon henry

    I am looking for JP Moran II who served as a marine in Vietnam toward the end of the war. I would like him to know that I wish I could have understood what he had experienced better. I want him to know I appreciate what he did.
    Thank you JP. I hope you are well-

  • http://twitter.com/WVeteran W.C Brooks

    thanx

  • Kathy Chau

    Grand daughter of a Vietnam Veteran whom I’ve never met, and my father doesn’t remember.
    He’s Half Vietnamese and half White…possibly more behind my race and back ground but I wouldn’t know.

    According to my father, he was told that his mom died when he was probably 3. My grandfather went back to America without him.

    Forgive me for I am only 18 and know nothing of my dad’s side of the family except for those who passed away. I was told that grandmother’s name is Chi Kim Chau/Chau Kim Chi.

    We have two or three pictures of her. One to honor her death. One, she was alive and laying on the bed posing for a picture and one of my father as a baby.

    I really don’t know why he couldn’t take my father with him.

    How is he? What’s he like? Does he think about us? Does he miss his son? Does he remember my grandmother?

    For years i’ve asked my dad for all the information he knew or remembers about it.

    Grandfather, who are you?

    CONTACT ME FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TELL ME ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING YOU KNOW ABOUT THIS:

  • Smithdg44

    keli just listen an say nothing he will go where an as far as his heart will let him. semper fi vietnam 68-69

  • Larry Blackmore

    My name is Larry, a Vietnam War Veteran, and I’m a guardian with Honor Flight Dayton (HFD). We fly Veterans to Washington, DC for free to see the memorials that honor them for their service and sacrifices. I also take pictures of deceased Veterans with me who served in WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War who never got to see their memorials. I then take a photo of the deceased Veteran’s picture next to a folded American flag at the appropriate memorial. The family will  receive an 8×10 color photo and a certificate from HFD honoring their Veteran. I also return the Veteran’s original photo to the family. There is no charge for doing this. This is HFD’s way of showing our respect and appreciation to your deceased family member of friend. If you or anyone else reading this post are interested or request further information, please respond back or email me at . To all of our Veteran heroes, “Thank You” for your service.

  • Mike

      

     FYI; Just before we landed at Oakland in Sept. of 1970, we were advised that there was a large(100-200) group of war protesters at the airport and they were spitting, cursing and throwing debris at all returning Vets that were landing there…, and that we should avoid them, as they were roped off.  I walked by at a distance and as some vets got close and confronted them , I stood and watched for awhile ..Soon, they all left.., only to be replaced by another ‘shift’ of protesters to make sure this activity continued 24/7

  • Chaplainlarry

     HEART of A SOLDIER

    We were that which others did not want to be.
    We went where others feared to go, and did what
    Others failed to do.
    In a strange and distant land.
    We asked nothing of those who gave us nothing,
    And reluctantly accepted the feeling of Loneliness
    Should we fail.
    We have seen the face of terror and felt the cold
    Reality of fear.
    We have  Anguished, Endured  and Hoped.
    Living through times that most say was best forgotten.

    We have known brotherly love and deep affection of
    Those with whom we have served.

    We hold dear the memory of their sacrifices.
    Knowing that we did what was expected of us.
    Even when those at home did not agree.

    But most of all,…After all was said and done.
    And the smoke of the battlefield has cleared.
    We know in our Hearts that all those who suffer the wounds of survival
    Can hold their heads high ….!
    Proud of what we were!
    American Soldiers Doing Our Duty


    HEART of A SOLDIER

    We were that which others did not want to be.
    We went where others feared to go, and did what
    Others failed to do.
    In a strange and distant land.
    We asked nothing of those who gave us nothing,
    And reluctantly accepted the feeling of Loneliness
    Should we fail.
    We have seen the face of terror and felt the cold
    Reality of fear.
    We have  Anguished, Endured  and Hoped.
    Living through times that most say was best forgotten.

    We have known brotherly love and deep affection of
    Those with whom we have served.

    We hold dear the memory of their sacrifices.
    Knowing that we did what was expected of us.
    Even when those at home did not agree.

    But most of all,…After all was said and done.
    And the smoke of the battlefield has cleared.
    We know in our Hearts that all those who suffer the wounds of survival
    Can hold their heads high ….!
    Proud of what we were!
    American Soldiers Doing Our Duty

    Larry Ager 67-69
    `CH (COL) Larry V. Ager Vietnam Veteran U.S. Army ret 67-69

  • Crypt

    i was with the 1st air wing across from dogpatch fromm 68-69

  • Janis

    Hi, Keli I was reading your post about your friend that’s a Vietnam Vet who seem to be having some problems of releasing and letting go it’s easier said than doing I married to a Vietnam Vet who still at times have his moments but he has found a release that has helped him to be able to move on with life, allowing him to live day by day and to cope with what has happen in the past you can mail me at and we can share more my husband would love to share with him and help him be able to move forward.  Waiting yo hear from you, blessing LadyJ

  • Cathy Chase

    My brother is a Viet Nam vet. He was spit on when he returned home. I have to say that I protested the war, but I did so because my Bro was there and also my boyfriend. I wanted the guys home safely and out of danger for this outrageous “war”. Our guys died and did not get the respect they deserved… and in my opion still don’t. Thank God they returned safely, but the guy my boyfriend enlisted with got killed by friendly fire. My brother got a job at the post office, which many men did, and took out a vehicle on his route scheduled for repairs. He had the jeep flip and tore his leg up pretty bad. He could not sue, of course!! He also suffered from agent orange and has been diagnosed with it. Right now he sleeps on a broken down couch in the living room of his home, because he is too paranoid to sleep in the bedroom with his wife. Thank God he has an understanding wife that loves him and they have been together “booKoo” years. Sorry if I don’t know how to spell that.  I love him more than anything. If anyone knows how to get him help with purchasing a bed that can adjust with his body, please let me know. He has had many surguries and needs to have his leg removed, but he says if Viet Nam didn’t take it, he will take it to his grave. I just want him to be comfortable and can help with the cost.       God bless all you Viet Nam Vets. I truly mean that. That was a war like no other. I can only imagine from the storeis from my brother. I only think he tells me now, because he feels he doesn’t have a lot longer to be here. I have to add…he is an amazing man that still makes me laugh till I cry and makes me cry for his pain. My best to you all-Cathy   

  • Ray Saikus

    Dear Mareinjax:
           Your brother will always be remember with the establishment of March 29 Vietnam Veterans Day. Please visit Equal Honor For All (www.equalhonor.org) and click on March 29 Vietnam Veterans Day to download and view the proposed legislation.

            Your family is part of and carrying on a great tradition. My best friend from high school, Marine Steve Victor Mylant, was killed in Vietnam on July 10, 1967 and he and his family are the primary motivating forces for my involvement with Veterans and this cause. His father was a Marine in Nicaragua and a Seabee during WWII. His sisters son is now a new Lieutenant in the Marines Corps Reserves and waiting to go to flight school.

             I would suggest you post your brother Joe’s full last name, a comrade might look your family up and it would contribute to your family’s and their healing.  

           We salute you and your family

    Ray Saikus, Secretary
    Vietnam Veteran 1968-69  173rd Airborne Brigade

    March 29 Vietnam Veterans Day
    Coalition of States Council       

  • http://www.smithmonitoring.com/ Home Security

    I also think March 30th is a time of healing and respect long over due.

  • Francisgm1

    I need help
    settling a disagreement between my husband (drafted in 1967) and I, please…
    Thinking back to the time of the Vietnam conflict, what do you think the
    “peace”
    sign represented, stood for or meant?

  • Mareinjax

    My brother Joe was killed in Vietnam on March 29, 1969.  That date is always Vietnam Vet Appreciation Day for me (I think of him often).     I remember when our men and women came home and I heard how they were being treated, I was outraged.  Fortunately, I didn’t see any of that first hand. People in my neighborhood thanked the men and women who came home and told them “don’t listen to all the BS”.  My Dad was a Marine too.  Now my son, 17, wants to be a Marine.  He wants me to sign him up now so he can leave soon after graduation and not have to wait.  I’m not signing; he’ll have to wait until he’s 18 to join.  I’m proud of him and proud he wants to be a Marine, but I’m not in a hurry for him to grow up.   Thank you all for your service, sacrifice, protection and for my freedom!  God Bless You All!